Lost Valley Observatory: Archived 12" LX200 Images
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Messier 51 (Whirlpool Galaxy), beautiful face on spiral galaxy with its smaller companion (NGC 5195) in the foreground (not gravitationally connected). Images were taken at 6 minutes throught red, green and blue filters with Meade GPS LX200 with SBIG ST10ME.  Processed with CCDSoft and Adobe Photoshop (By KBQ, May 17, 2003).
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The Eagle Nebula (M16 or NGC 6611) is a large open star cluster and an associated emission nebula (prominent red feature throughout image).  The cluster and nebula are about 6500 light years distant and 70 light years in diameter.  The central feature is the so called "Eagle" or "Star Queen", which is an absorbtion nebula in the foreground.  Imaged with Meade 12" LX200 with Starlight Express MX7C camera (8 minutes) and processed with adobe photoshop (KBQ on 6/08/02)

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M33, also known as the Pinwheel Galaxy, located in the constellation of Andromeda.  Located 2.3 million light years away, with a diameter of 60,000 light years, and a relatively large visible angular size of 60 by 40 arc minutes. This widely spred out spiral galaxy is believed to contain about 6 billion stars.  Imaged with LX 200 with ST10-ME at 360 seconds for red, green and blue .  Processed with CCDSoft and Adobe Photoshop (10/24/02 by KBQ)

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M13, considered to be the most spectacular globular star cluster in the northern hemisphere and located in the constellation of Hercules, 21,000 light years distant, diameter of 140 light years. According to Kepple and Sanner's 'The Night Sky Observer's Guide' (a great catalogue of deep sky objects), our galaxies family of 150 star clusters are located primarily in a sphere about 200 light years from the galactic core, with the number increasing as we approach the core.  These stars tend to be quite old, many being off the main sequence (red giants common).  Imaged with 12" LX200 with ST10-ME, 1 sec each for light, red, green and blue (5/17/03 by KBQ)

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M-17 (NGC 6618), also known as the Omega nebula or Swan Nebula, located in Sagittarius.  This is a beautiful emission nebula and associated open star cluster has an angular size of 20 by 15 arc minutes and is easily seen with binoculars.  Imaged with Meade GPS LX-200 (at F-4.5 with Lumicon Giant Easy Guider) using SBIG ST10-ME, and autoguided with SBIGs STV for 180 seconds for red, green, and blue.  Processed with CCDSoft and Adobe Photoshop (July 25, 2003, KBQ). 

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Leonid meteor shower, with single meteor image captured as it passed over treetops in the southwest in a hazy evening.  Imaged with a 35 mm Olympus OM1 camera at 1.8 F-stop with camera set open on bulb setting for 60 seconds on stable mount.  The Leonids are considered one of the brightest yearly meteor displays occuring when the Earth passes through the remnants of a comet which passed through our orbit, with the best displays occuring every 33 years, with up to 40 leonids seen each second at its peak (November 17, 2001, KBQ).

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M-31 (NGC 224), Great Galaxy of  Andromeda, with associated galaxies
M 32 and M 110.  Located 2.2 million light years distant and part of our Local Group of galaxies. First discovered as a faint "smudge" in 905 AD by the Persian astronomer Al Sufi, it is notable as being the site where Hubble discovered the Cepheid variable which put this "nebula" out of our own galaxy, thereby beginning the process of discovereing that many so called "nebula" were actually "island universes" (galaxies"), each made up of billions of stars. This dramatically changed our picture of the universe and our (very small) place in it (up until then the theory of Shapley and others indicated that the entire universe was enclosed in our Milky Way galaxy, less than 100,000 light years in diameter).  Imaged with Tele Vue  NP101 (F-5.4) with Fuji Superia 400 using Taurus camera (parafocal focusing) and autoguided for 35 minutes with SBIG STV autoguider and separate guidescope.  Digitalized with Poloroid SprintScan 35 Plus and processed with Adobe Photoshop (August 8, 2002, KBQ).

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M-1, also known as the Crab Nebula, located in the constellation of Taurus.  This was the site of a supernova recorded by the Chinese in 1054 AD.  At its height, it could be seen in the daylight and was visable at night for a year.  It appears to be expanding at a rate of about 1,000 miles per second.  At its center is a rapidly rotating neutron star.  The Chandra X-Ray observatory (satellite) has published an amazing video (see http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2002/0052/movies.html ).  Imaged with  SBIG ST-10 ME with Meade 12" LX-200 operating at F-4 (using Lumicon Giant Easy Guider) and autoguided at F-3.75 guidescope with SBIG STV.  Imaged for 180 seconds for red, green, and blue; processed with CCDSoft and Adobe Photoshop 7.0 (10/26/02, by KBQ).

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Trapezium region of M 42, known as Orion's Nebula.  Located just below the belt (along the sword) of Orion, at a distance of 1600 light years.  This is a classic emission nebula with a small associated open cluster of young stars (perhaps 20-40 million years old).  This image shows the "trapezium' or center of the nebula where these young stars are emitting (among other things) ultraviolet light which ionizes hydrogen, which later recombines, releasing  energy including visable light (primarily 'red' at 6562 angstoms, the so called 'hydrogen-Alpha line), resulting in the deep red color of this and a number of nebula.   Imaged using Tele Vue NP 101 (F-5.4) with SBIG ST10-ME at 20 seconds for R,G and B, processed with CCDSoft and Adobe Photoshop 7.0.  (January 12, 2003, KBQ). 

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